Establishing Fault in a Maryland Multi-Vehicle Car Accident

When people think of a typical, run of the mill car accident, they may assume that most accidents take place between two parties. Sometimes, however, accidents can take place between multiple parties, which can both increase the severity and consequences following the collision, but also make things complicated when it comes to establishing who is truly at fault. To best advocate for yourself following a multiple vehicle accident, it is crucial that Maryland drivers understand how fault is determined and how state laws can have an impact on these delineations.

According to a recent local news report, three individuals were pronounced dead after a fatal multi-vehicle car accident. Maryland police reported that the driver of a Camaro was traveling in excess of 100 miles per hour eastbound in a westbound lane when it crashed head-on with a Corolla. Investigators believe that the debris from this initial accident disabled the third vehicle involved, a Mitsubishi Eclipse. The Camaro’s driver, an additional passenger in the Camaro, and the driver of the Corolla were both pronounced dead on the scene by emergency responders. The driver of the Eclipse and his passenger did not require medical treatment. The investigation is ongoing and being conducted by the Maryland State Police Crash Team.

In Maryland, before figuring out how to establish and apportion fault, it is crucial to understand the basics of the state’s auto accident laws. Maryland employs at-fault car insurance coverage requirements, which means that drivers who cause an accident are responsible for paying for resulting damage and medical bills.

In addition, Maryland apportions fault using a contributory negligence model. This means that potential plaintiffs are required to provide evidence that the at-fault party or parties are solely responsible for any damage resulting from the accident and cover them entirely. If the at-fault party can prove, however, that a potential plaintiff bears any responsibility for causing the accident, the potential plaintiff may be barred from receiving compensation under the contributory negligence framework.

Following a major car accident, especially one involving multiple vehicles, it may feel overwhelming to know where to start with filing a claim or pursuing legal action. Potential plaintiffs who were hit by other at-fault parties should first file a claim against the at-fault driver’s insurance company, consider filing a personal injury lawsuit with the assistance of an experienced Maryland personal injury attorney, or file a claim with their personal insurance policy in the event that the at-fault driver or drivers do not have vehicle insurance.

Do You Need a Maryland Car Accident Attorney?

If you or someone you know was recently involved in a Maryland car accident with multiple vehicles, you may be entitled to compensation by filing a personal injury claim against the at-fault parties. At Lebowitz & Mzhen, our team of experienced personal injury attorneys have represented clients in all types of personal injury and accident claims and will advocate tirelessly on your behalf to get you the compensation you deserve. To schedule a free initial consultation today, contact us at 800-654-1949.

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